CFP (Re)viewing Reality: Visuality and Perception in the Ancient World, University of Toronto, 1-2 April 2016

(Re)viewing Reality: Visuality and Perception in the Ancient World
Call for Papers

CFP Deadline: 1 February 2016
1-2 April 2016
Department of Classics, University of Toronto
Graduate Student Conference

Keynote Speakers:
Andrew Feldherr, Princeton University
SeungJung Kim, University of Toronto

The graduate students of the Department of Classics invite papers that will explore how ancient thinkers, authors, and artists negotiated the paradoxes of vision and its relation to truth, however truth may be conceived. Although seeing and knowing were deeply linked both linguistically and conceptually, the relation between the two was not entirely transparent. Perception and misperception informed the ancients? understanding of their own realities in potentially disruptive and/or distorting ways. We aim to investigate how visual perception operated as a medium of comprehension, and how it continues to shape our own sense of the ancient world.

We welcome submissions from all subdisciplines of Classics that will engage with the ancient tensions between seeing and knowing, seeming and being, perception and reality. Potential paper topics may include, but are not limited to:
? ancient theories of visual or other sensory perception
? modern theoretical approaches to visuality: film theory, affect theory, theories of the gaze
? narrative ekphrasis and/or enargeia as literary constructions of visual reality
? the relation between visual/material and literary representations of narrative
? optical illusion and distortion in art and architecture
? visualizing gender and sexuality
? visuality and veracity, autopsy and inquiry in ancient historiographical narrative
? rhetoric, persuasion, and the representation of ?truth?
? visuality in politics: performativity, spectacle, and power
? the optics of dramatic performance and hyper-reality on the stage

Please submit abstracts (.doc/.docx/.pdf) of no more than 300 words, for papers of 15-20 minutes in length, to utoronto.grad.classics@gmail.com by February 1, 2016. Participants will be notified via email.

Advertisements

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s